The Magic of the Cities.

Zen promotes the rediscovery of the obvious, which is so often lost in its familiarity and simplicity. It sees the miraculous in the common and magic in our everyday surroundings. When we are not rushed, and our minds are unclouded by conceptualizations, a veil will sometimes drop, introducing the viewer to a world unseen since childhood. ~ John Greer

Showing posts with label Desierto de los Leones. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Desierto de los Leones. Show all posts

Wednesday, August 22, 2012

West Hills Woods III




Photographers feel guilty that all they do for a living is press a button. - Andy Warhol

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Tuesday, August 21, 2012

West Hills Woods II




Sometimes I enjoy just photographing the surface because I think it can be as revealing as going to the heart of the matter. - Annie Leibovitz

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Monday, August 20, 2012

West Hills Woods



Mexico City Woods : Desierto de los Leones
Desierto de los Leones (Desert of the Lions) National Park is located in the Sierra de las Cruces mountain range west of the city center with an area of 1,867 hectares, representing fifteen percent of the entire Valley of Mexico. The area was used as a retreat for a religious group, thus the name Desierto (Desert) means not "arid place", but not populated. The "Leones" part of the name does not refer to the animals, but rather to the original landlord's lastname.

The park's altitude varies between 2,600 and 3,700 meters above sea level, giving the area a relatively cold and damp climate. It is a forested area primarily with pines, oyamel firs and holm oaks with many brooks, ravines and waterfalls. The park is considered to be the oldest protected biosphere in Mexico.

The park's name, Desierto de los Leones, is largely due to the Carmelite monastery situated just north of its center. Carmelite monks called their residences “deserts”. But the exact origin of “de los Leones” is not known. The first monastery complex was constructed between 1606 and 1611. By 1711, this structure had deteriorated greatly. It was demolished and a new one was built in its place adjoining just south of the original complex.

By the end of the 18th century, the cold, damp weather and increasingly frequent visitors forced the monks to move their monastery to Tenancingo in 1801. The monastery was declared a national monument on 16 May 1937. The 18th-century structure has a number of areas that have been restored and opened to the public. In addition to the old monastery, the park attracts visitors for the nature that surrounds the complex. The park offers activities such as day camping, overnight camping, hiking, and mountain biking. [Wiki]

More images of this beautiful place : Desierto de los Leones I - Desierto de los Leones II and Summertime   and Summertime II

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Thursday, August 9, 2012

Into The Woods


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Thursday, June 14, 2012

IV












Be not simply good - be good for something.
~Henry David Thoreau

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Wednesday, June 13, 2012

III







-What are you shooting?
-Everything...  plants, flowers, trees, people, kids...
-Why?
-I don't know...

-Do you want a photo?
-No
-Well.. Yes!

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Tuesday, June 12, 2012

Summertime II









Zen and the Art of Photography

Wayne Rowe California State Polytechnic University, Pomona.

Driven by a passion for photography and a fascination with the Zen Buddhist
philosophy,
the author conceptually and experientially examines the relationship
between Zen Buddhism and the art of photography.
Among the subjects discussed:
What is the relationship between haiku and photography?
What is the relationship between the mind of the photographer while creating a photograph and the Zen concept of the Empty Mind?
What role does intuition and feeling play in photography?
In Zen?
Through examination of these concepts and relationships,
the author explains the heightened awareness, joy,
and enlightenment he has experienced through photography
and suggests ways that others may share in
the creative process.


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Thanks for visiting, please be sure that I read each and every one of your kind comments, I appreciate them all. Stay tuned.

Monday, June 11, 2012

Summertime






Desierto de los Leones (Desert of the Lions) National Park is located in the Sierra de las Cruces mountain range west of the city center with an area of 1,867 hectares, representing fifteen percent of the entire Valley of Mexico. The area was used as a retreat for a religious group, thus the name Desierto (Desert) means not "arid place", but not populated. The "Leones" part of the name does not refer to the animals, but rather to the original landlord's lastname.

The park's altitude varies between 2,600 and 3,700 meters above sea level, giving the area a relatively cold and damp climate. It is a forested area primarily with pines, oyamel firs and holm oaks with many brooks, ravines and waterfalls. The park is considered to be the oldest protected biosphere in Mexico.

The park's name, Desierto de los Leones, is largely due to the Carmelite monastery situated just north of its center. Carmelite monks called their residences “deserts”. But the exact origin of “de los Leones” is not known. The first monastery complex was constructed between 1606 and 1611. By 1711, this structure had deteriorated greatly. It was demolished and a new one was built in its place adjoining just south of the original complex.

By the end of the 18th century, the cold, damp weather and increasingly frequent visitors forced the monks to move their monastery to Tenancingo in 1801. The monastery was declared a national monument on 16 May 1937. The 18th-century structure has a number of areas that have been restored and opened to the public. In addition to the old monastery, the park attracts visitors for the nature that surrounds the complex. The park offers activities such as day camping, overnight camping, hiking, and mountain biking. [Wiki]

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Thanks for visiting, please be sure that I read each and every one of your kind comments, I appreciate them all. Stay tuned.

Monday, July 13, 2009

Desierto de los Leones 1





The Desierto de los Leones (Desert of the Lions) National Park is located entirely within the limits of the Federal District, it is located in the Sierra de las Cruces mountain range west of the city center with an area of 1,867 hectares, representing fifteen percent of the entire Valley of Mexico. The area was used as a retreat for a religious group, thus the name Desierto (Desert) means not "arid place", but not populated. The "Leones" part of the name does not refer to the animals, but rather to the original landlord's lastname.

The park's altitude varies between 2,600 and 3,700 meters above sea level, giving the area a relatively cold and damp climate. It is a forested area primarily with pines, oyamel firs and holm oaks with many brooks, ravines and waterfalls. The park is considered to be the oldest protected biosphere in Mexico. It was originally declared a forest reserve in 1876 by President Lerdo de Tejada with the intent of conserving its fresh water springs to supply Mexico City. It was later declared a national park on 27 November, 1917, by President Venustiano Carranza.

The name of the park, Desierto de los Leones (Desert of the Lions) largely comes from the Carmelite monastery situated just north of its center. Carmelite monks called their residences “deserts” because they served as isolation from the mundane world. The monastery’s original name was Santo Desierto de Nuestra Señora del Carmen de los Montes de Santa Fe.
The monastery was built in the very early 17th century for a group of Carmelite monks who came from Italy to evangelize the Native Americans. The first stone was laid on 23 January 1606 by then-Viceroy Juan de Mendoza y Luna. It was a relatively simple structure of two stories, with a wood shingle roof, narrow corridors and small rooms called “cells” for the monks to sleep and study in. A 12,570 meter wall was built with only one opening facing the town of Cuajimalpa which still remains.

Outside the main gate of the monastery, just beyond the traces of the walls of the original monastery, is the “Chapel of Secrets.” It has a domed roof and its acoustics allowed monks face into the corner to speak to another monk during the long stretches of imposed silence in the monastery. Surrounding the entire complex is the “Barda de la Excomunicacion” (Wall of Excommunication) named so because supposedly any woman that crossed it was subject to excommunication from the Catholic Church. [Wiki]

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