The Magic of the Cities.

Zen promotes the rediscovery of the obvious, which is so often lost in its familiarity and simplicity. It sees the miraculous in the common and magic in our everyday surroundings. When we are not rushed, and our minds are unclouded by conceptualizations, a veil will sometimes drop, introducing the viewer to a world unseen since childhood. ~ John Greer

Showing posts with label The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Show all posts
Showing posts with label The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Show all posts

Saturday, March 22, 2014

Light Moments

Empire State Building From The School of Visual Arts. New York City
Rome
Seine. Paris
Roma Borough. Mexico City
Javier Marin, sculpture.
Condesa Borough. Mexico City

Self-portrait
Guanajuato
Central Park. NYC
The Metropolitan Museum of Art. NYC
NYC Streets

The world around us is very mysterious.
It doesn't yield its secrets easily.
Now we are concerned with losing self-importance.
As long as you feel that you are the most important thing in the world,
You cannot really appreciate the world around you.
You are like a horse with blinders,
All you see is yourself apart from everything else.
Don Juan


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Wednesday, October 3, 2012

At The Met





It’s not the photographer who makes the picture, but the person being photographed. 
~Sebastiao Salgado

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Wednesday, August 15, 2012

The Triumph of Marius


The Triumph of Marius
Giovanni Battista Tiepolo  (Italian, Venice 1696–1770 Madrid)
Date: 1729.  Medium: Oil on canvas. Dimensions: Irregular painted surface, 220 x 128 5/8 in. (558.8 x 326.7 cm)

The subject of this triumphal procession is identified by a Latin inscription at the top of the canvas from the Roman historian Lucius Anneus Florus (Epitome of Roman History, 36:17): "The Roman people behold Jugurtha laden with chains." The African king Jugurtha is shown descending a hill before his captor, the Roman general Gaius Marius. A youth beats a tambourine while other figures carry booty, including a bust of the mother goddess Cybele. The thirty-year-old Tiepolo included his portrait among the figures at the left. The procession was held on January 1, 104 B.C.

The picture—a masterpiece of Tiepolo's early maturity—is from a series of ten canvases painted about 1725–29 to decorate the main room of the Ca' Dolfin, Venice. [The Metropolitan Museum of  Art]



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Saturday, June 2, 2012

New York Light IV









Make Beautiful Manifesto

I am the creator, maker of moments,
Fighter of what I want versus what is expected of me.
I believe beauty is found in imperfections.
Every situation is an opportunity to capture beauty.
Today I open my eyes onto the world.
Embrace that it will become what I make it.
A place that has purpose.
Where stories inspire me to capture them.
It's time to share. Make the world right.
Make the world a work of art. 
Make Beautiful.

Share your photos from Hipstamatic to either Twitter or Instagram with the tag #makebeautiful to get them into the stream. To read the Make Beautiful manifesto, and for more info on posting, click here.

"A photograph is always invisible, it is not it that we see."
Roland Barthes
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Sunday, January 29, 2012

Figure in the Garden





Figure in the Garden
May 20, 2011–Ongoing
The Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden, exterior, first floor

Sculpture Garden installation brings together figurative works from the late 19th century to the present day. Making its debut in the Sculpture Garden is Figurengruppe/Group of Figures, by contemporary German artist Katharina Fritsch (b. 1956). Conceived in 2006–08, the work features nine life-size sculptures of, among other figures, St. Michael, a Madonna, a giant, and a snake, all rendered in precise detail and finished in bold colors. Religious symbolism and references to mythology abound, yet any fixed meaning remains open and elusive. Group of Figures is joined by earlier works such as Auguste Rodin’s heroic St. John the Baptist Preaching (1878–80) and Aristide Maillol’s pensive Mediterranean (1902–05). Striking a casual pose in his derby hat is Elie Nadelman’s Man in the Open Air (c. 1915), and perched atop a tall pedestal is Gaston Lachaise’s open-armed, voluptuous Floating Figure (1927). Perennial favorites like Picasso’s She-Goat (1950) and Miró’s Moonbird (1966) are on view as well, in addition to works by Renée Sintenis, Max Ernst, Alberto Giacometti, Henry Moore, and Tom Otterness.

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Friday, January 20, 2012

The Moment of Creation








From Carlos Castaneda's Journey to Ixtlan

People tell us from the time we are born that the world is such and such
and so and so, and naturally we have no choice but to see the world
the way people have been telling us it is.

Seeing happens only when one sneaks between the worlds;
The world of ordinary people and the world of sorcerers.
The real thing is when the body realizes that it can see.

Only then is one capable of knowing that the world we look at every day
Is only a description.
My intent has been to show you that.

Only as a warrior can one survive the path of knowledge,
Because the art of a warrior
Is to balance, the terror of being a man with the wonder of being a man.



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Thursday, September 29, 2011

The Cloisters III







The Unselfconscious Process
One of the most confusing and paradoxical aspects of Zen is its view of the self. Zen says we aren't who we think we are. While we are seen to exist in the relative sense, in terms of the absolute, the dance and the dancer are considered to be one. Many spiritual traditions have seen similar truths, and claim that by losing one's life, life is indeed gained. By emptying we become full. While no doubt confusing for the novice, its implication for the photographer would be to forget oneself, as much as possible, when taking pictures. This, in fact, is a very common experience among musicians and painters, who often report "losing themselves" in their art. In a sense, the picture takes itself. In the words of Henri Cartier-Bresson, "you have to blend in like a fish in water, you have to forget yourself." The artist becomes the process of creation. When something bigger than the persona takes charge, when Life itself is given free reign unhampered by our premeditated ideas of what should happen, the resultant pictures can be quite remarkable.
John Greer. Artist's Statement (Fragment)


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Wednesday, September 28, 2011

The Cloisters II

Head, perhaps an Angel. Limestone. France. Île-de-France, about 1250.





Altar Frontal. Catalunya, Spain. ca. 1225


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Monday, September 26, 2011

The Cloisters I




Head. Strasbourg. 1280-1300

The Angel of Annunciation. Northeastern Italy 1430-40.

The Cloisters museum and gardens, the branch of The Metropolitan Museum of Art devoted to the art and architecture of medieval Europe, was assembled from architectural elements, both domestic and religious, that date from the twelfth through the fifteenth century.
The building and its cloistered gardens—located in Fort Tryon Park in northern Manhattan—are treasures in themselves, effectively part of the collection housed there. The Cloisters' collection comprises approximately three thousand works of art from medieval Europe, dating from about the ninth to the sixteenth century.
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